22
March
2024

Key updates to Electric Vehicle charging

Developers should avoid treating EV charging as a tick-box exercise, and instead view it as an opportunity.

Lawrence Isaac | Construction & Projects Paralegal

The global automotive industry is experiencing a significant transformation driven by the increasing adoption of electric vehicles (EVs). As governments and societies prioritise sustainability and environmental consciousness, the demand for EVs has surged, leading to substantial growth in the electric car market.

To support this transition, new building regulations are being implemented to ensure the infrastructure necessary for EV charging is readily available.

The electric car market has witnessed exponential growth in recent years, with major automotive manufacturers investing heavily in electric vehicle technology. Factors such as advancements in battery technology, government incentives, and growing environmental awareness among consumers have contributed to this surge.

According to recent data, the global electric car market is projected to continue its upward growth trajectory, with sales expected to surpass traditional internal combustion engine vehicles in the coming years.

As a result, this has led to the ‘Part S – Infrastructure for charging electric vehicles’ being introduced to the Building Regulations 2010, requiring the installation of EV charging points in the following circumstances:

Residential

  • New residential homes – A charging point for each home with onsite parking.
  • New residential buildings with parking in a covered car park – each dwelling with a parking space must have a charging point.
  • Buildings converted for residential use, and which have a car park – each dwelling with a parking space must have a charging point.
  • Residential buildings undergoing major renovation work will have more than 10 parking spaces – each dwelling must have one charging point and all other parking spaces cable routes.

Commercial

  • New non-residential buildings with more than 10 parking spaces – must have a minimum of one charging point and cable routes for at least 20% of the remaining spaces.
  • Mixed-use buildings – the requirements for residential buildings above and non-residential buildings above apply. Calculations are required based on the number of parking spaces designated for use by the respective classes of occupant.

What does this mean for the Developers?

Developers should avoid treating EV charging as a tick-box exercise, and instead view it as an opportunity. The changes to the regulations are designed to future-proof homes as electric cars replace petrol and diesel vehicles as the new normal. By offering charging infrastructure, properties become much more attractive to residents.

However, ensuring compliance with building regulations related to EV charging infrastructure adds another layer of complexity for developers. Failure to adhere to regulatory requirements could result in fines, delays, or even legal consequences, posing a risk to project timelines and budgets.

If you would like to view the requirements in full, you can read the document on infrastructure for the charging of electric vehicles here.

If you have questions or would like more information regarding the new building regulations for electric vehicle charging points our expert Real Estate team is on hand to offer practical guidance and support. 

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